First Aid (Reacting to an Emergency)

First Aid (Reacting to an Emergency)

Amputation

First Aid (A to E)

Animal Bites

First Aid (A to E)

Black Eyes

First Aid (A to E)

Bleeding

First Aid (A to E)

Bruise

First Aid (A to E)

Burns

First Aid (A to E)

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

First Aid (A to E)

Chemical Burns

First Aid (A to E)

Chemical Splash in the Eyes

First Aid (A to E)

Chest Pain

First Aid (A to E)

Chocking

First Aid (A to E)

Corneal Abrasion

First Aid (A to E)

Cut & Scrapes

First Aid (A to E)

Dislocation

First Aid (A to E)

Electrical Burns

First Aid (A to E)

Electrical Shock

First Aid (A to E)

Fainting

First Aid (F to G)

Fever

First Aid (F to G)

Food-borne Illness

First Aid (F to G)

Foreign Object in the Ear

First Aid (F to G)

Foreign Object in the Eye

First Aid (F to G)

Foreign Object in the Nose

First Aid (F to G)

Foreign Object in the Skin

First Aid (F to G)

Foreign Object Inhaled

First Aid (F to G)

Fractures (Broken Bones)

First Aid (F to G)

Frostbite

First Aid (F to G)

Gastroenteritis

First Aid (F to G)

Head Pain (Headache)

First Aid (H to P)

Head Trauma

First Aid (H to P)

Heart Attack

First Aid (H to P)

Heat Cramps

First Aid (H to P)

Heat Exhaustion

First Aid (H to P)

Heat Stroke

First Aid (H to P)

Human Bites

First Aid (H to P)

Hypothermia

First Aid (H to P)

Insect Bites and Stings

First Aid (H to P)

Motion Sickness

First Aid (H to P)

Nose Bleeds

First Aid (H to P)

Poisoning

First Aid (H to P)

Puncture Wounds

First Aid (H to P)

Severe Bleeding

First Aid (Q to Z)

Shock

First Aid (Q to Z)

Snake Bites

Snake Bites First Aid

Spider Bites

First Aid (Q to Z)

Spinal Injury

First Aid (Q to Z)

Sprain

First Aid (Q to Z)

Stroke

First Aid (Q to Z)

Sunburn

First Aid (Q to Z)

Tick Bites

First Aid (Q to Z)

Tooth Loss

First Aid (Q to Z)

Toothache

First Aid (Q to Z)

First Aid (Reacting to an Emergency)

First Aid is the temporary help given to an injured or a sick person before professional medical treatment can be provided. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, lifesaving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipment’s. Basic training in first aid skills should be taught in school, in work places and, in general, be learnt by all, as it is mandatory to our modern and stressful life.

Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid which can be carried out using minimal equipment’s. First aid tips can guide a layman to make better decisions on what to do, what not to do and how to provide immediate care during medical emergencies. It is important to have a first aid kit available. Keep one at home and one in your car.

Getting Ready to Help

All you really need is common sense and readily available materials such as clean water, rolled newspaper, strings, safety pines, clean cloth antiseptic lotion etc. You might also need a helpful bystander, to call for help, and to help carry the patient, if necessary.

If the injury occurs in a public place, crowd management is most important. Organising people and resources is also important. You will have to keep bystanders away from the injured, so that helpers can get on with rescue operations. It is useful to know ambulance and police call numbers and call for them at the earliest.

Do you need a First Aid box - experience has shown that most of the medicines, antiseptics, bandages and tools usually found in first aid kits are not necessary for administering first aid.

In fact, if you keep bandages and dressings stored for a long time, they usually gather dust containing all kinds of bacterial spores and even fungi. Even bandages and dressings sold in sterile bags can contain harmful organisms if they are not checked regularly for damage. A clean cloth that has been washed and dried may often be safer and better.

Taking an injured person to the hospital - if an ambulance is not present, use any vehicle available to carry a patient to the hospital. The type of vehicle is not as important as long as it can carry a patient comfortably and safely.

In the absence of an ambulance, make sure that she/he does not get hurt further or feel more uncomfortable or aggregate the injury while being shifted.

Make a stretcher - if a ready-made stretcher is available then make use of that, but it is not essential. What is important is a strong and rigid flat surface, which keeps the spine stable. An improvised stretcher may be any wooden board or one made from two or three boards or poles tied together, or from a bench seat taken out from a motor vehicle. Two or three persons can roll a patient on to a stretcher as though you were rolling a log on the ground.

Though rapid transportation is important, in towns and cities it is not possible to go beyond a certain speed without endangering the lives of patients and those outside the vehicle. It is not necessary to speed while taking patients to hospital. The time saved by speeding is insignificant. In fact, speeding could even cause yet another accident.

Care during transportation - during the process of shifting, the back, neck and airways have to be protected from further injury. If the patient is unconscious, gently place a large folded cloth or towel under the neck so that the neck does not sag against the ground. This provides good support for the neck.

If the patient has only a limb injury then it is possible to transport him to a hospital in a sitting position. Take care to support the limb by splinting or wrapping cloth to protect the limb and absorb bleeding. While in the vehicle try to keep the injured limb from touching the floor of the vehicle as bumps in the road are easily transmitted from the floor, causing greater agony to the patient. If the person is severely injured, it is better if the vehicle has enough space to keep the patients back straight, and the person accompanying should be able to care for the patient if necessary.

At all times during transportation keep a watch on whether the patient’s airway is clear, whether the patient is breathing (a clear airway does not necessarily mean that the patient is breathing), and whether you can feel a pulse in the patient. By feeling the pulse you can make out that the heart is beating. A patient may look fine, right after the injury but it may take some time before signs and symptoms of injury become obvious.

"To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one's family, to bring peace to all,
one must first discipline and control one's own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment,
and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him." - Buddha